Anxiety

Experiencing anxiety is part of being human. We all feel anxious and under stress from time to time. In fact, in its mildest everyday form, anxiety is important - it helps us to survive. The experience of being a little anxious can involve a heightened alertness and greater focus, which assist us to plan, manage and negotiate our way through life's challenges.

 

We can all relate in our own way to times when our experience of anxiety has interfered with our lives, like being preoccupied, fearful or worried to the point of distraction, or when our body might feel like it is out of control. We might have shortness of breath, a racing heart, sweaty palms, dizziness, disorientation or disturbing dreams. Persistent symptoms like these can be quite debilitating and may severely impact on a person's capacity to function effectively. Panic attacks, phobias, obsessive compulsive tendencies and post traumatic stress may be related to the broader banner of debilitating anxiety.

 

Fortunately, these symptoms are generally quite treatable. With the range of approaches used to treat these symptom patterns, some treatments tend to focus on learning new behaviours and de-emphasising 'old' patterns (behaviour therapy), while other treatments focus more on identifying and changing unhelpful thought patterns and altering one's responses to them (cognitive behaviour therapy). Learning a variety of relaxation strategies can also make significant inroads to overcoming the debilitating aspects of the problem.

 

Experiencing anxiety is part of being human. We all feel anxious and under stress from time to time. Pressures and obligations from day to day living tend to increase as we get older and as our responsibilities grow. The increasing pace of our lives and change in the world also increases our levels of uncertainty. These are all factors which combine to bring about uncertainty and anxious feelings.

 

In its mildest everyday form, anxiety is important. It helps us to survive. The experience of being a little anxious can involve a heightened alertness and greater focus, which assist us to plan, manage and negotiate our way through life's challenges. Anxiety has to do with things that matter to us. If it didn't matter you wouldn't bother. Sometimes, it's the 'bothering' that's the problem.

 

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So when does anxiety become a problem?

 

We can all relate in our own way to times when our experience of anxiety has interfered with our lives. When our suffering has reached such heights that we are unable to manage our lives in a way that we might choose.

 

When we are preoccupied, fearful or worried to the point of distraction. When our body might feel like it is out of control. When we can recognise that our fears are unreasonable yet they still prevent us from doing things that we want to do.

 

Shortness of breath, racing metabolism/heart rate, sweaty palms, tingling, dizziness, disorientation, persistent negative thinking, the 're-experiencing' of traumatic events, the re-occurrence of disturbing dreams or disturbing themes in dreams. These aspects of anxiety can tend to trip us up, and prevent us from doing what we want or need to do. Persistent symptoms like these can be quite debilitating and may severely impact on a person's capacity to function effectively. Panic attacks, phobias, obsessive compulsive tendencies and post traumatic stress are some of the diagnoses that are considered to be related to the broader banner of debilitating anxiety.

 

Fortunately, these symptoms are generally quite treatable. There are of course a variety of approaches used to treat these symptom patterns. Some treatments tend to focus on learning new behaviours and de-emphasising 'old' patterns (Behaviour Therapy), while other treatments will focus more on identifying and changing unhelpful thought patterns and altering one's responses to them (Cognitive Behaviour Therapy). Learning a variety of relaxation strategies can also make significant inroads to overcoming the debilitating aspects of the problem.

 

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Our approach

 

Listed alphabetically, our approach to treating anxiety includes:

 

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Biofeedback

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

Debriefing and Defusing

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing 

Hypnosis

Neuro-feedback

Relaxation and Meditation

Solution Oriented Counselling

Thought Field Therapy

Voice Dialogue

 

 

What if - you really don't need to keep doing the things that hold you back? What if the relief of finding an alternative and more productive path proved the key to maintaining a new direction? Imagine that.